Media Releases https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/ en Celebrating every letter of STEM https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/news-and-media/celebrating-every-letter-stem <h1 class="au-header-heading">Celebrating every letter of STEM</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/10" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Horne</span></span> <span>Wed, 2019-10-16 15:20</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Chief Scientist has applauded the breadth of scientific endeavour recognised in the 2019 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science, celebrating achievements across the full spectrum of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).</p> <p>You can read the media release below, or download it as a <a href="https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/sites/default/files/2019-11/Celebrating-every-letter-of-STEM2019.pdf">PDF</a>.</p> <p>*******</p> <p><strong>CELEBRATING EVERY LETTER OF STEM</strong></p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, has applauded the breadth of scientific endeavour recognised in the 2019 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science, celebrating achievements across the full spectrum of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).</p> <p>“The S in STEM is science – but it’s often impossible to disentangle new scientific breakthroughs from the T, E and M that make them possible,” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>“Where would our new anti-cancer drugs be, without the rigorous scientific trials to prove their effectiveness? How do you program self-adapting headphones to improve your hearing, without technology and engineering to make them tangible? Or the complex mathematics of group theory, central to secure banking, digital signatures and secure internet communication.”</p> <p>“From the development of breakthrough molecular imaging tools, and the discovery of new immune cells: the winners of this year’s Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science showcase the multidisciplinary nature of science today.”</p> <p>Dr Finkel said the prizes also recognised some of Australia’s biggest advocates for the STEM subjects: school science teachers.</p> <p>“It’s more important than ever that we ensure our children are STEM literate: that they have the tools to navigate tomorrow’s world with confidence and curiosity,” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>“And in this endeavour, there’s no one as deserving of praise as our exceptional primary and secondary school teachers. Their passion inspires their students in turn to challenge themselves, follow their interests, and engage in the STEM subjects.</p> <p>“As the Chair of the Judging Committee, it’s been my privilege and challenge to see so many wonderful examples of great Australian science. I thank the members of the committee for their tireless efforts in considering the truly exceptional Australian scientists and innovators nominated for this year’s awards.”</p> <p>The 2019 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science were presented to recipients across seven categories, who shared in $750,000 prize money. Further information about the prizes is available at <a href="http://www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes">www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes</a>.</p> <p><strong>Media enquiries:</strong> 0410 029 407 or <u><a href="mailto:communications@chiefscientist.gov.au">communications@chiefscientist.gov.au</a>.</u></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The 2019 recipients of the Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science are:</strong></p> <p><strong>Prime Minister’s Prize for Science:</strong><br /> Emeritus Professor Cheryl Praeger AM, The University of Western Australia</p> <p><strong>Prime Minister’s Prize for Innovation:</strong><br /> Professor David Huang, Professor Andrew Roberts, Professor Guillaume Lessene and Associate Professor Peter Czabotar<strong>, </strong>Walter &amp; Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research</p> <p><strong>Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year:</strong><br /> Associate Professor Laura Mackay, The University of Melbourne</p> <p><strong>Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year:</strong><br /> Associate Professor Elizabeth New, The University of Sydney</p> <p><strong>Prize for New Innovators</strong><br /> Dr Luke Campbell, Nura Operations Pty Ltd, Victoria</p> <p><strong>Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Primary Schools:</strong><br /> Mrs Sarah Finney, Stirling East Primary School, South Australia</p> <p><strong>Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools: </strong><br /> Dr Samantha Moyle, Brighton Secondary School, South Australia</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 16 Oct 2019 04:20:46 +0000 Kathleen Horne 1320 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: The prescription for the future: Precision Medicine https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/10/media-release-the-prescription-for-the-future-precision-medicine <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: The prescription for the future: Precision Medicine</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Fri, 2018-10-12 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Your future healthcare will be increasingly fine-tuned to your unique personal needs, reports a new Occasional Paper from the Office of Australia’s Chief Scientist.</p> <p>You can read the media release below, or download it as a <a href="/sites/default/files/Precision-Medicine-paper-OCS-media-release.pdf">PDF. </a></p> <p><strong>THE PRESCRIPTION FOR THE FUTURE: PRECISION MEDICINE</strong></p> <p>Your future healthcare will be increasingly fine-tuned to your unique personal needs, reports a new Occasional Paper from the Office of Australia’s Chief Scientist.</p> <p>“We know that every human is a one-off result of their genes and their life experiences,” Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel said. “Advances in science and technology are clearing the way to what medicine has always aspired to provide: person-specific, custom-fit care.”</p> <p>The Occasional Paper explores the promise of precision medicine, a term capturing the collective impact of advances in genomics, data science and computing. It draws on a report produced by Australia’s Learned Academies, working collaboratively as ACOLA.</p> <p>The cost of sequencing a genome has fallen from over $100 million in the early 2000s to $1000 today, making the technology far more accessible to laboratories and clinics.</p> <p>The technologies accelerating biomedical research are also transforming bedside care, in the form of more targeted treatments and more timely and accurate diagnostic tests. This can be seen in the hundreds of cancer patients already receiving customised therapy based on genome analysis, and metabolic defects being identified in newborn babies more rapidly and accurately than ever before.</p> <p>Lead author of the report Professor Robert Williamson highlighted Australia’s potential. “Australia has and will continue to make a strong contribution through our research,” Professor Williamson said. “The challenge for policymakers is to ensure the benefits are widely shared.”</p> <p>Dr Finkel, also emphasised the importance of public policy in guiding the healthcare transition ahead. “Precision medicine can ensure that Australian life expectancies remain amongst the highest in the world, but patients must have confidence that their personal data will be protected.”</p> <p>The paper can be downloaded at <a href="https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/10/occasional-paper-precision-medicine/">https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/10/occasional-paper-precision-medicine/</a></p> <p>The Learned Academies’ report can be downloaded at<a href="https://acola.org.au/wp/pmed/"> https://acola.org.au/wp/pmed/</a>.</p> <p><strong>Media inquiries:</strong> 0410 029 407 or <a href="mailto:communications@chiefscientist.gov.au">communications@chiefscientist.gov.au</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Thu, 11 Oct 2018 23:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1191 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: A Hydrogen Industry on the National Agenda https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/08/media-release-a-hydrogen-industry-on-the-national-agenda <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: A Hydrogen Industry on the National Agenda</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Fri, 2018-08-17 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Hydrogen could be Australia’s next multibillion dollar export opportunity, according to a panel of energy, technology and policy leaders who presented their findings to the COAG Energy Council last week.</p> <p>Dr Alan Finkel, Chair of the Hydrogen Strategy Group and Australia’s Chief Scientist, said that hydrogen’s time has come.</p> <p>You can read the media release below, or download it as a <a href="/sites/default/files/Hydrogen-briefing-OCS-media-release.pdf">PDF</a>.</p> <p>17 August, 2018</p> <p>Hydrogen could be Australia’s next multibillion dollar export opportunity, according to a panel of energy, technology and policy leaders who presented their findings to the COAG Energy Council last week.</p> <p>Dr Alan Finkel, Chair of the Hydrogen Strategy Group and Australia’s Chief Scientist, said that hydrogen’s time has come.</p> <p>“Hydrogen produces only water vapour and heat when burned. When produced from water using renewable electricity, or from coal or methane combined with carbon capture and storage, it’s a close to zero-emissions fuel. With appropriate safeguards, it’s just as safe as natural gas, and just as convenient for consumers.</p> <p>“In Australia, we have all the necessary resources to make hydrogen at scale: wind, sun, coal, methane, carbon sequestration sites and expertise.</p> <p>“It’s simply never been commercially viable. Now, the economics are changing.”</p> <p>Dr Finkel explained that the key developments were the falling costs for renewable energy and Japan’s commitment to be a long-term, large-scale customer for hydrogen produced through low-emissions methods.</p> <p>“Japan currently imports 94% of its energy in the form of fossil fuels. To reduce its emissions, government and industry have put ambitious hydrogen uptake targets at the heart of a comprehensive energy transition plan,” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>“We’re not alone in this race. Norway, Brunei and Saudi Arabia are all boosting their credentials as future hydrogen suppliers. This is the time for Australia to stake its claim as supplier of choice not just to Japan, but to other nations like South Korea, hungry for a twenty-first century fuel.”</p> <p>With the right policy settings, Australian hydrogen exports could contribute $1.7 billion and provide 2,800 jobs by 2030, according to a recent report from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). Many of the opportunities will be concentrated in regional communities, where proof-of-concept hydrogen trials are already underway.</p> <p>Hydrogen could also be introduced in the near-term into Australia’s existing gas network for heating and cooking, and as a low-emissions alternative to diesel for long-distance heavy transport.</p> <p>The COAG Energy Council agreed that Dr Finkel, in close consultation with officials, will bring back a proposal for the development of a national hydrogen strategy to its December 2018 meeting.</p> <p>Dr Finkel thanked the members of the Hydrogen Strategy Group and taskforce for their work in developing the briefing paper.</p> <p>Hydrogen for Australia’s Future is available at: <a href="https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/08/briefing-paper-hydrogen-for-australias-future/">https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/08/briefing-paper-hydrogen-for-australias-future/</a>.</p> <p>Media inquiries: 0410 029 407 or <a href="mailto:communications@chiefscientist.gov.au">communications@chiefscientist.gov.au</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 17 Aug 2018 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1190 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: Taking charge of energy storage opportunities https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/07/media-release-taking-charge-of-energy-storage-opportunities <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: Taking charge of energy storage opportunities</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Fri, 2018-07-06 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Australia has a myriad of technical and community opportunities in the booming energy storage sector, according to a paper released by the Office of the Chief Scientist.</p> <p>You can read the media release below, or download it as a <a href="/sites/default/files/Chief-Scientist-media-release-Energy-Storage-paper.pdf">PDF</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>TAKING CHARGE OF ENERGY STORAGE OPPORTUNITIES</strong></p> <p>6 July 2018</p> <p>Australia has a myriad of technical and community opportunities in the booming energy storage sector, according to a paper released by the Office of the Chief Scientist.</p> <p>The paper highlights that in 2017 Australia led the world in the installation of residential battery storage systems in terms of power capacity, on the back of high penetration of household solar rooftop panels.</p> <p>Aside from battery systems, there is rising interest in pumped hydro projects to store energy, and Australia is well-placed to be a leader in exporting renewable hydrogen; the paper concludes.</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist and report co-author Dr Alan Finkel said energy storage would be crucial to the future of Australia’s electricity network.</p> <p>“We are entering an era of rapid technological transformation in electricity generation and usage,” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>“Energy storage technologies can not only help us benefit from the transition but to prosper through the creation of new industries, new jobs and opening up export markets.”</p> <p>The paper notes that 1.8 million buildings in Australia are fitted with rooftop solar panels and the majority are residential.</p> <p><em>Taking Charge: The Energy Storage Opportunity for Australia</em> is a summary and update of a detailed report on energy storage by the Australian Council of Learned Academies (ACOLA) released in November 2017.</p> <p>The paper can be downloaded at <a href="http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/">www.chiefscientist.gov.au</a>. The original ACOLA report can be downloaded at <a href="http://www.acola.org.au/wp/esp/">www.acola.org.au/wp/esp/</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 06 Jul 2018 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1192 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: Education Council releases STEM Industry-Schools Partnerships report https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/04/media-release-education-council-releases-stem-industry-schools-partnerships-report <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: Education Council releases STEM Industry-Schools Partnerships report</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Mon, 2018-04-23 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Education Council has today released its STEM Industry-Schools Partnerships report.</p> <p>The full media release is below, including quotes from Dr Finkel in his role as the Chair of the STEM Partnerships Forum. To view the full report, go to the <a href="http://www.educationcouncil.edu.au/EC-Reports-and-Publications.aspx">Education Council website</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p>23 April 2018</p> <p><strong>Education Council releases STEM Industry-School Partnerships report</strong></p> <p>The Chair of the Education Council, the Hon. Minister John Gardner MP, has welcomed the contribution of Australian industry to boosting STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) programs in schools. In releasing the final report from the STEM Partnerships Forum, titled Optimising STEM Industry-School Partnerships: Inspiring Australia’s Next Generation, the Minister highlighted the importance of STEM skills in solving front-line, real-world problems.</p> <p>“Business needs skills, students need careers, and Australia needs industries that are primed for the future,” Minister Gardner said.</p> <p>“We need to ensure that Australian students are focussed on attaining the high levels of maths and science skills and knowledge that are necessary to fully participate in the modern workforce and in society,” said Minister Gardner.</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel, who chaired the STEM Forum, presented the report to the Education Council meeting in Adelaide on 13 April.</p> <p>“STEM education that is relevant and high quality is key to Australia’s future. We know this as parents; industry knows it too, and wants to help. This report is about making the most of these partnerships to best benefit schools, students and industry,” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>The report collects the lessons of high-quality partnership programs, including industry-sponsored competitions, classroom equipment kits, problem-solving challenges and teacher professional development. It is the result of 12 months of work that included extensive national consultations with over 150 people attending meetings, and the receipt of 53 written submissions.</p> <p>“This report encourages more businesses to help schools bring science to life for every student. It will also be an important input into discussions of national education reforms,” Minister Gardner said.</p> <p>On behalf of the Education Council, Minister Gardner thanked Dr Finkel for his leadership in chairing the STEM Forum.</p> <p>The report is available at <a href="http://www.educationcouncil.edu.au">www.educationcouncil.edu.au</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Mon, 23 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1193 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: Nominations closing soon for science prizes https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/03/media-release-nominations-closing-soon-for-science-prizes <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: Nominations closing soon for science prizes</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Tue, 2018-03-06 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel has reminded the Australian science community to get cracking on nominations for the 2018 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science, with entries closing in less than three weeks.</p> <p>You can read the media release below, or download it as a <a href="/sites/default/files/Chief-Scientist-Nominations-closing-soon-for-science-prizes-6-March.pdf">PDF</a>.</p> <p><strong>NOMINATIONS CLOSING SOON FOR SCIENCE PRIZES</strong></p> <p>6 March 2018</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel has reminded the Australian science community to get cracking on nominations for the 2018 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science, with entries closing in less than three weeks.</p> <p>Now in their 19th year, Dr Finkel said the prestigious Prizes celebrate the achievements of Australian scientists, teachers and innovators across the country.</p> <p>“Over the years, the Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science have showcased many successes made possible by a diverse scientific workforce. The 2017 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science recipient Professor Jenny Graves is an outstanding example, leading the world with her pioneering research into mammalian sex chromosomes,” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>“Australian scientists excel in every field, and come from a huge variety of backgrounds. I encourage everyone in the science community to nominate someone exceptional for these awards, and recognise the tremendous breadth of our science and innovation workforce.”</p> <p>The prizes open for nominations are:</p> <ul> <li>The Prime Minister’s Prize for Science</li> <li>The Prime Minister’s Prize for Innovation</li> <li>The Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year</li> <li>The Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year</li> <li>The Prize for New Innovators</li> <li>The Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Primary Schools</li> <li>The Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools</li> </ul> <p>Dr Finkel said training a diverse workforce started with making science, technology, engineering and maths subjects accessible and approachable for every student.</p> <p>“The key factor in student engagement is often an incredible teacher. I’m delighted that teachers of mathematics and technology are now eligible to be nominated for their fantastic work alongside their science colleagues,” he said.</p> <p>Nominations for the 2018 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science close at 5PM AEST, Monday 26 March, with each award including prize money ranging from $50,000 up to $250,000. For further details or to nominate, go to <a href="https://www.business.gov.au/Assistance/Inspiring-Australia-Science-Engagement/Prime-Ministers-Prizes-for-Science">business.gov.au/scienceprizes</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 06 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1194 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: Innovation and Science Australia's strategic plan for Australia's innovation future released https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2018/01/media-release-innovation-and-science-australias-strategic-plan-for-australias-innovation-future-released <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: Innovation and Science Australia&#039;s strategic plan for Australia&#039;s innovation future released</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Tue, 2018-01-30 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Innovation and Science Australia released its strategic plan for Australia’s innovation future on 30 January 2018.</p> <p>The full media release is below, including quotes from Dr Finkel in his role as Deputy Chair. To view the report or for more information, go to the <a href="https://industry.gov.au/Innovation-and-Science-Australia/media_centre/Pages/Innovation-and-Science-Australias-2030-Plan---media-release.aspx">Innovation and Science Australia website</a>.</p> <p><strong>Innovation and Science Australia’s strategic plan for Australia’s innovation future released</strong></p> <p>30 January 2018</p> <p>Innovation and Science Australia (ISA) has challenged Australians, and their governments, to be bolder in using innovation to unlock economic and social opportunity for the future.</p> <p>The call came as ISA Chair, Mr Bill Ferris AC, launched Australia 2030: Prosperity through Innovation (the 2030 Plan) with the Minister for Jobs and Innovation, Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash, at Astor Industries in Western Sydney earlier today.</p> <p>Australia should use ambitious –National Missions’ to strengthen Australia’s innovation culture and demonstrate that Australia’s world-class innovation, science and research system can be used to solve some of the biggest global challenges of the coming decades, according to one of the 2030 Plan’s recommendations to Government.</p> <p>'ISA recommends that Australia seek to become the healthiest nation on earth through the integration of genomics and precision medicine capabilities into the Australian health system; such a National Mission would eventually be of extraordinary benefit to all Australians,’ Mr Ferris said.</p> <p>'The 2030 Plan also calls for a feasibility study into using a National Mission to address coral bleaching challenges faced by the Great Barrier Reef, and we welcome the Government’s recent funding announcement for this phase of the project.</p> <p>The mission would pursue innovative adaptation and reef restoration technologies in order to optimise the chances for survival of the reef beyond 2030,’ Mr Ferris said.</p> <p>Mr Ferris said the 2030 Plan is focused on continuing national prosperity driven by innovation, and is founded on the urgent need for an acceleration in the development and commercialisation of Australian ideas and inventiveness.</p> <p>Recommendations include measures to stimulate higher levels of Research and Development expenditure by the business sector, which the 2030 Plan says lags behind that seen in the business sector of competitor nations.</p> <p>'For industry, our vision is by 2030 Australia will have many more examples of high-growth firms exporting innovative goods and services to markets around the world,’ Mr Ferris said.</p> <p>'To do this Australian business’ investment in research and development needs to increase, which for policy-makers means ensuring that government support programs are delivering the best bang for their buck.</p> <p>In order for Australian businesses to seriously compete with the best international firms they need access to the best and brightest talent – from both domestic and global talent pools,’ Mr Ferris said.</p> <p>'This makes a world-class education system, and a confident, outward-looking immigration policy a must for our innovation system.’</p> <p>The 2030 Plan makes 30 recommendations to the Australian Government, actionable within five core policy imperatives for: education, industry, Government, research and development, and culture and ambition.</p> <p>ISA Deputy Chair and Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel AO, emphasised the importance of education and research in the 2030 Plan.</p> <p>'We need a relentless focus on raising the bar across the entire education system, combined with investment in our national research assets, to profit from the global knowledge economy,’ Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>Mr Ferris hoped the 2030 Plan would encourage robust national discussion on the importance of innovation to Australia’s future, and result in a strong and positive response from governments and the wider community at all levels.</p> <p>'Looking towards 2030, innovation will be integral to the expansion and international competitiveness of Australia’s economy. Given Australia’s ageing population, the real challenge is unlikely to be a shortage of jobs, but rather a shortage of workers appropriately skilled to fill those jobs.’</p> <p>'The ISA Board believes Australia can expect to become a leading innovation nation by 2030, thereby securing sustainable prosperity if all five imperatives and related 30 recommendations are actively addressed,’ Mr Ferris said.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 30 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1196 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: YOU'RE ON THE HOOK – READ A BOOK! https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2017/12/media-release-youre-on-the-hook-read-a-book <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: YOU&#039;RE ON THE HOOK – READ A BOOK!</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Thu, 2017-12-14 00:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel has challenged everyone to share a great book with a special child over the summer holidays.</p> <p>You can read the media release below, or download it as a <a href="/sites/default/files/Chief-Scientist-media-release-Storytime-pledge.pdf">PDF</a>.</p> <p><strong>YOU’RE ON THE HOOK: READ A BOOK!</strong></p> <p>14 December 2017</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel has challenged everyone to share a great book with a special child over the summer holidays.</p> <p>“Behind every great scientist is a library of inspirational books, and an adult who introduced them,” said Dr Finkel, launching the 2017 Storytime Pledge campaign.</p> <p>“We can all help our children to pick up the pen on the future, by hooking them on reading today.</p> <p>“In following days we will share children’s book recommendations and reading pledges from some of Australia’s leading scientists, inventors and thinkers, including Nobel Laureate Peter Doherty, queen of quantum Michelle Simmons, and marine ecologist Emma Johnson.</p> <p>“Join us in taking the Storytime Pledge: I promise, you’ll be glad that you did.”</p> <p>Dr Finkel nominated the children’s classic Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown as a family favourite.</p> <p>“I read to my boys every night that I could, often drifting off to sleep with them, and I admit it, occasionally even dozing off before they did,” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>“Life got busy, but story time never stopped, until my boys were ready to seize the books themselves.”</p> <p>Dr Finkel emphasised that education was a mission for everyone.</p> <p>“Parents, grandparents, guardians, aunts, uncles, cousins, neighbours, family friends: let’s all take the pledge to give our children a head-start on life.”</p> <p>Storytime Pledges will be posted on the Chief Scientist’s website <a href="http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/">www.chiefscientist.gov.au</a>.</p> <p>Add your pledge using the Twitter hashtag <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=tweets&amp;q=%23storytimepledge">#StorytimePledge</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> <li><a href="/news/storytime-pledge" hreflang="en">Storytime Pledge</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 13 Dec 2017 13:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1184 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Media Release: Celebrating small science with big impact https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2017/10/media-release-celebrating-small-science-with-big-impact <h1 class="au-header-heading">Media Release: Celebrating small science with big impact</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Wed, 2017-10-18 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, has congratulated the winners of the 2017 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science.</p> <p>You can read the media release below, or download it as a <a href="/sites/default/files/Chief-Scientist-Prime-Ministers-science-prizes-18-October-2017.pdf">PDF</a>.</p> <p>The Australian science community has celebrated big discoveries on the smallest of scales at the presentation of the 2017 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science.</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, said the Australian scientists and innovators were all about dreaming big – even when their work was only visible by microscope.</p> <p>“When we think of the undiscovered reaches of science, it’s easy to look to the vast frontiers of space travel or the deep oceans to fuel our imagination,” he said.</p> <p>“But as this year’s Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science remind us that great things often come in small packages, and have enormous impact on our lives.</p> <p>“From understanding chromosome control systems; proteins to repair tooth damage; new genetic data techniques; and microscopes that can see individual molecules inside living cells, the 2017 Prizes recognise big breakthroughs played out on a tiny canvas.</p> <p>“The Prizes also recognise the incredible role played by teachers, who understand that from little things, big things grow! Great teachers provide fertile ground for our children to become tomorrow’s great scientists and innovators in turn.”</p> <p>Dr Finkel said the Prizes showcased the enormous strength and dedication of the Australian science community.</p> <p>“As Chair of the science prizes selection committee, it was a pleasure to see the incredible depth and breadth of Australian science through the lens of the many outstanding nominations received,” he said.</p> <p>“I’d also like to thank the members of the committee for their tireless efforts, as we faced the welcome challenge of considering each exceptional candidate.”</p> <p>The 2017 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science were presented to recipients across six categories, who shared in $700,000 prize money. Further information about the prizes is available at <a href="http://www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes">www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 18 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1195 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Statement: Australian Government Energy Announcement https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2017/10/statement-australian-government-energy-announcement <h1 class="au-header-heading">Statement: Australian Government Energy Announcement</h1> <span><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">brynn</span></span> <span>Tue, 2017-10-17 10:53</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel has made a statement on the Australian Government’s energy announcement.</p> <p>17 October, 2017</p> <p>1) The electricity Review that I chaired proposed an orderly transition (Recommendation 3.2) to achieve the key outcomes of increasing security and reliability, affordability and lowering emissions. I am pleased that the Australian Government asked the Energy Security Board to provide advice on this matter. The Energy Security Board was one of the key recommendations from our Review. Consisting of the energy market regulators and an independent Chair and Deputy Chair, it is the country’s most authoritative voice in energy matters.</p> <p>2) I know from consultations with the Energy Security Board in the later stages of the development of the new proposals that the process was thorough.</p> <p>3) The orderly transition proposed in our Review consists of three parts.</p> <ul> <li>First, an agreement by Commonwealth, State and Territory governments to an emissions reduction trajectory for the National Electricity Market.</li> <li>Second, a credible mechanism to enable the regulators to ensure that new low emissions energy enters the market. We compared a number of mechanisms and concluded that, on balance, of those we analysed the Clean Energy Target mechanism was preferred. However, other mechanisms could be used by the regulators to achieve the same goal. The Government’s commitment to a retailer obligation for low emissions energy under the National Energy Guarantee appears to be a credible mechanism.</li> <li>Third, a requirement that entry of new low emissions generation should occur in the context of a Generator Reliability Obligation for new generators (Recommendation 3.3). The Government’s National Energy Guarantee imposes an equivalent obligation on retailers to ensure the reliability of the electricity system is preserved as new low emissions generation enters.</li> </ul> <p>4) Success of the proposed emissions and reliability guarantees in the National Energy Guarantee will depend on extensive consultation by the Energy Security Board with all market participants.</p> <p>5) Given that the existing operation of the National Electricity Market is managed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) through the National Electricity Laws, it is appropriate that the integration of the entry of new low emissions generation into the market is managed through the same laws.</p> <p>With the adoption of a process for an orderly transition, Australia will be able to strategically manage its electricity supply for maximum benefit.</p> <p>Dr Alan Finkel</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/national-electricity-market-review" hreflang="en">NATIONAL ELECTRICITY MARKET REVIEW</a></li> <li><a href="/news/media-releases" hreflang="en">Media Releases</a></li> </ul> </div> Mon, 16 Oct 2017 23:53:57 +0000 brynn 1309 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au