OCS Publications https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/news/ocs-publications en Backing up the planet – world battery storage https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2016/10/backing-up-the-planet-world-battery-storage <h1 class="au-header-heading">Backing up the planet – world battery storage</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Tue, 2016-10-18 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Office of the Chief Scientist has published a fact sheet outlining the battery storage that would be needed for worldwide grid-scale energy storage.</p> <p>The storage capacity of all batteries produced in 2014 could store 11 minutes and 27 seconds of global electricity demand. This paper outlines the level of battery production needed to provide up to five days of global electricity backup.</p> <p>Download the <a href="/sites/default/files/Battery-storage-template-FINAL-1.pdf">Backing up the planet – world battery storage </a>fact sheet.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Mon, 17 Oct 2016 23:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 908 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Science and maths in Australian secondary schools datasheet https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2016/07/science-and-maths-in-australian-secondary-schools-datasheet <h1 class="au-header-heading">Science and maths in Australian secondary schools datasheet</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Tue, 2016-07-05 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Office of the Chief Scientist has published a <a href="/sites/default/files/2-Science-and-Maths-in-Australian-Secondary-Schools-datasheet-Web.pdf">datasheet</a> summarising student performance and participation in science and mathematics in Australian secondary schools, and the supply of qualified teachers.</p> <p>The datasheet has been updated following the release of new data from the <a href="http://research.acer.edu.au/timss_2015/2/">Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2015</a> and the OECD’s <a href="http://research.acer.edu.au/ozpisa/22/">Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015</a>. TIMSS assesses Year 4 and Year 8 students every four years; PISA is conducted every three years to access the competencies of 15-year-old students in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy. An updated version for 2018 is in development.</p> <p>In PISA 2015, Australia’s performance has dropped in maths since 2003, while our international ranking has declined dramatically.</p> <p>In PISA 2015, there were significant differences in the mean performance of Australian students in both science and maths based on where they live, their socioeconomic status, and between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. Students from high socio-economic backgrounds are performing at levels 3 years of schooling ahead of those from low socio-economic backgrounds.</p> <p>Participation in most Year 12 mathematics and science subjects is declining, and for science is the lowest in 20 years. Just one in 10 students completes advanced mathematics. TIMSS 2015 data show that older students are losing interest in maths – with 13 per cent of students in Year 8 versus 37 per cent of students in Year 4 liking maths.</p> <p>The Staff in Australia’s Schools 2013 Survey indicates that around 20 per cent of secondary maths and science teachers across all sectors (government, independent and Catholic) are teaching 'out of field’ – i.e. they are not qualified to teach the subject. TIMSS 2011 data show that the proportion of schools that have difficulty filling Year 8 maths and science teaching positions was about double the international average.</p> <p>Read the <strong>2017</strong> Science and maths in Australian secondary schools <a href="/sites/default/files/2-Science-and-Maths-in-Australian-Secondary-Schools-datasheet-Web.pdf">datasheet</a>. References and notes are available <a href="/sites/default/files/2-Science-and-Maths-in-Australian-Secondary-Schools-datasheet-references.pdf">here</a>.</p> <p>The <strong>2016 </strong>edition of the <a href="/sites/default/files/OCS-Datasheet-secondary-schools_WEB-VERSION.pdf"> datasheet</a> and <a href="/sites/default/files/OCS-Datasheet-secondary-schools_REFERENCES.pdf">references and notes</a> also remain available for download.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 909 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Report: Australia's STEM Workforce https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2016/03/report-australias-stem-workforce <h1 class="au-header-heading">Report: Australia&#039;s STEM Workforce</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Thu, 2016-03-31 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.480px_wide" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="c9ec0f52-4e96-34cd-8165-ba589a121e06" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity align-left"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/480px_/public/Australias-STEM-workforce_infographic.jpg?itok=fxxRc8Ft" width="480" height="679" alt="Key facts" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <p>A new report by the Office of the Chief Scientist provides the first detailed analysis of Australia’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) trained workforce.</p> <p>By investigating the demographics, industries, occupations and salaries of STEM workers, the report is a valuable resource for students, teachers and policymakers.</p> <p>Based on data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing, the report finds that Australia’s STEM workforce are employed in a diverse range of jobs.</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel said that <em>Australia’s STEM Workforce</em> provides a wealth of information on where a STEM qualification may take you.</p> <p>“Studying STEM opens up countless job options and this report shows that Australians are taking diverse career paths.” Dr Finkel said.</p> <p>“It is critical that qualifications at all levels prepare students for the breadth of roles and industries they might pursue.”</p> <p><em>Australia’s STEM Workforce</em> can be downloaded as a full report, or by chapters below. For readers interested in particular STEM disciplines, Part 2 of the report focusses on detailed analysis of selected disciplines, which can be opened as stand alone chapters.</p> <p>An <a href="/sites/default/files/Infographic.pdf">infographic</a> illustrating key findings from the report is also available.</p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Australias-STEM-workforce_full-report.pdf">Australia’s STEM Workforce – Full report</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Foreword.pdf">Foreword</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-1-Introduction.pdf">Chapter 1 Introduction</a></p> <p> </p> <p>Part 1 Australia’s STEM capability </p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-2-Demographics.pdf">Chapter 2 Demographics of Australia’s STEM qualified population</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-3-Employment-status.pdf">Chapter 3 Employment status of Australia’s STEM qualified population</a></p> <p> </p> <p>Part 2 Pathways of university STEM graduates in Australia </p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-4-Pathways-of-university-STEM-Graduates-overview.pdf">Chapter 4 STEM pathways: Overview</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-5-Physics-and-Astronomy.pdf">Chapter 5 STEM pathways: Physics and astronomy</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-6-Chemical-sciences.pdf">Chapter 6 STEM pathways: Chemical sciences</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-7-Earth-Sciences.pdf">Chapter 7 STEM pathways: Earth sciences</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-8-Biological-Sciences.pdf">Chapter 8 STEM pathways: Biological sciences</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-9-Agricultural-Sciences.pdf">Chapter 9 STEM pathways: Agricultural sciences</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-10-Environmental-Sciences.pdf">Chapter 10 STEM pathways: Environmental studies</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-11-Information-Technology.pdf">Chapter 11 STEM pathways: Information technologies</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-12-Engineering-and-Related-Technologies.pdf">Chapter 12 STEM pathways: Engineering and related technologies</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-13-Mathematical-Sciences.pdf">Chapter 13 STEM pathways: Mathematical sciences</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Chapter-14-Future-directions.pdf">Chapter 14 Future Directions</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/Appendix-and-References.pdf">Appendixes and References</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Thu, 31 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 904 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au SPI 2016 – STEM Programme Index 2016 https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2016/01/spi-2016-stem-programme-index-2016-2 <h1 class="au-header-heading">SPI 2016 – STEM Programme Index 2016</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Wed, 2016-01-20 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A new guide released today by the Office of the Chief Scientist will help teachers and students access over 250 science, technology, engineering and mathematics programmes.</p> <p>The first national STEM Programme Index (<a href="/sites/default/files/SPI2016_release.pdf">SPI 2016</a>) is an accessible guide to business, university, government and community-led STEM initiatives. It includes in-class, after school, holiday and online activities and resources, catering to a wide and growing range of students.</p> <p>“The opportunities of the future will be made through STEM, for Australia and the Australians with the skills to thrive through change,” said Australia’s Chief Scientist Professor Ian Chubb AC.</p> <p>The guide was compiled by the Australian Industry Group and funded by the Office of the Chief Scientist as part of the STEM Skills Partnerships programme.</p> <p>SPI 2016 is available <a href="/sites/default/files/SPI2016_release.pdf">here</a>, or download the <a href="http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2016/01/media-release-an-index-for-australias-future-innovators">media release</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 20 Jan 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 906 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Position Paper: Transforming STEM teaching in Australian primary schools: everybody's business https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2015/12/position-paper-transforming-stem-teaching-in-australian-primary-schools-everybodys-business <h1 class="au-header-heading">Position Paper: Transforming STEM teaching in Australian primary schools: everybody&#039;s business</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Fri, 2015-12-11 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A <a href="/sites/default/files/Transforming-STEM-teaching_FINAL.pdf">position paper </a>released today by the Office of the Chief Scientist outlines steps that Australia can take to transform the teaching of science, mathematics and technology in primary schools.</p> <p><em>“It is great teaching, more than any other attribute, which accounts for the success of the world’s best performing school systems.”</em></p> <p>Focussing on the training, development and support of primary teachers, the paper advocates the following:</p> <p>1. Raise the prestige and preparedness of teachers, by</p> <p>(i) Attracting high achievers in STEM to primary school teaching.</p> <p>(ii) Boosting the science, technology and mathematics in pre service teaching and increasing the rigour of pre-service courses</p> <p>2. Transform STEM education in primary schools, by</p> <p>(iii) Ensuring teachers in every school are supported by STEM specialist teachers</p> <p>(iv) Creating a national professional development program in science, technology and mathematics.</p> <p>(v) Educating principals to be leaders in STEM.</p> <p>3. Think bold, collaborate and lead change.</p> <p><em>“These are the steps we can take today to make great teaching of science, technology and mathematics the norm in Australian schools, and teaching a profession of choice for our high achievers.”</em></p> <p>Read the paper as a <a href="/sites/default/files/Transforming-STEM-teaching_FINAL.pdf">pdf</a> or download the <a href="http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2015/12/media-release-helping-teachers-to-inspire-students">media release</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/submissions" hreflang="en">Chief Scientist&#039;s Submissions</a></li> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 11 Dec 2015 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 910 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Benchmarking Australian Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2014/12/benchmarking-australian-science-technology-engineering-mathematics <h1 class="au-header-heading">Benchmarking Australian Science, Technology, Engineering &amp; Mathematics</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Mon, 2014-12-01 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>On December 1, the report <em>Benchmarking Australian Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics </em>was released.</p> <p>This follows the tabling of the report at the inaugural meeting of the <a href="http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2014/11/commonwealth-science-council/">Commonwealth Science Council</a>.</p> <p>To read the report online, click <a href="/sites/default/files/BenchmarkingAustralianSTEM_Web_Nov2014.pdf">here</a></p> <p>To print the report, click <a href="/sites/default/files/BenchmarkingAustralianSTEM_Print_Nov2014.pdf">here</a></p> <p>In his foreword to the report, Australia’s Chief Scientist Professor Ian Chubb says: “In view of the central importance of STEM, we need to know how we perform. We need to get 'a fix’ on our performance—not an easy one, against 'the world’, but a more challenging one, against nations that, like us, are essentially free-market economies with serious science engagement.</p> <p>“…This report provides insights into where we are and will help us decide what we should do. As an analysis mostly at a high level—signposts in kilometres not metres, let alone centimetres—it is intended to highlight performance and trends that might warrant further investigation, prompt questions for government and contribute to discussion on the future shape and scale of Australian STEM.</p> <p>“The report is about encouraging wise decisions, not about making them. Used well, it will help us improve and help us position Australia in a changing world.”</p> <p>Links to media coverage of the report are available <a href="http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/?p=7534">here</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Mon, 01 Dec 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 851 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS: AUSTRALIA'S FUTURE https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2014/09/professor-chubb-releases-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics-australias-future <h1 class="au-header-heading">SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS: AUSTRALIA&#039;S FUTURE</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Tue, 2014-09-02 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>On 2 September, Professor Chubb released his recommendations for a strategic approach to science and its related fields. The document can be downloaded <a href="/sites/default/files/STEM_AustraliasFuture_Sept2014_Web.pdf">here</a></p> <p><em>“Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: Australia’s Future </em>outlines what we need to do to build a stronger, more competitive Australia,” Professor Chubb said at Parliament House.</p> <p>“Science is infrastructure and it is critical to our future. We must align our scientific effort to the national interest; focus on areas of particular importance or need; and do it on a scale that will make a difference to Australia and a changing world,” Professor Chubb said</p> <p>“I have outlined how to develop better capacity and capability through strategic investment, good planning and long-term commitment.”</p> <p><em>STEM: Australia’s Future</em> focuses on:</p> <ul> <li>Building competitiveness</li> <li>Supporting high quality education and training</li> <li>Maximising research potential</li> <li>Strengthening international engagement</li> </ul> <p>“We are the only OECD country without a science or technology strategy. Other countries have realised that such an approach is essential to remaining competitive in a world reliant on science and science-trained people,” Professor Chubb said.</p> <p>“I have drawn on the views of our science community and Australian business in framing this set of recommendations. I look forward to continuing working with government in securing a better future for Australia.”</p> <p><strong>Media enquiries: Mick Bunworth 02 6102 8179 or 0410 029 407 </strong><a href="mailto:Mick.Bunworth@chiefscientist.gov.au"><strong>Mick.Bunworth@chiefscientist.gov.au</strong></a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 02 Sep 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 852 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au The Curious Country https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2013/11/the-curious-country <h1 class="au-header-heading">The Curious Country</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Thu, 2013-11-21 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div data-embed-button="media_entity_embed" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:media.480px_wide" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="0c0c6fd5-e434-3894-b733-e5216bc1d099" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity align-left"> <article> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/480px_/public/New-Image.jpg?itok=R6lZQNbW" width="480" height="677" alt="The Curious Country book cover" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </div> </article> </div> <p>During 2013, The Office of the Chief Scientist asked Australians what they would like to know more about; what scientific issues concern them and what discoveries inspire them.</p> <p>The results shaped this book – a collection of essays about the scientific issues affecting Australians today.</p> <p><em>The Curious Country</em> is available as a free download from ANU E Press. It is currently available as a pdf, so can be downloaded and read on your e-book reader, tablet, computer or mobile phone. <a href="http://press.anu.edu.au/titles/the-curious-country/">Download it here</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Thu, 21 Nov 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 911 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics in the National Interest: A Strategic Approach https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2013/07/science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics-in-the-national-interest-a-strategic-approach <h1 class="au-header-heading">Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics in the National Interest: A Strategic Approach</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Wed, 2013-07-31 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>On July 31, Chief Scientist Professor Ian Chubb released the position paper: “<a href="/sites/default/files/STEMstrategy290713FINALweb.pdf">Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in the National Interest: A Strategic Approach</a>.”</p> <p>The paper presents an approach for a national strategy to guide Australia’s STEM enterprise and was released in an address to the National Press Club.</p> <p>You can <a href="/sites/default/files/STEMstrategy290713FINALweb.pdf">download the paper here</a> and a copy of Professor Chubb’s <a href="/sites/default/files/NPCFINAL.pdf">speech here.</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 31 Jul 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 885 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Benchmarking Australian Science Performance https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2013/02/benchmarking-australian-science-performance <h1 class="au-header-heading">Benchmarking Australian Science Performance</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Fri, 2013-02-22 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>22 February 2013</p> <p>Australia’s Chief Scientist Professor Ian Chubb has released a new look at our national scientific performance.</p> <p>“It has often been said that we punch above our weight. While that may be true, it appears that our aspiration needs to be higher,’’ Professor Chubb said.</p> <p>The analysis of citation rate (as an indicator of research quality) is contained in the latest occasional paper from the Office of the Chief Scientist.</p> <p>“In terms of citation per paper, we do not out-perform the countries with an embedded scientific culture that we might aspire to be like – the Western European democracies, Scandinavia or the United States and Canada,’’ Professor Chubb said.</p> <p>A second supplement released with the occasional paper shows that the citation rates of 30 per cent of Australian papers are above the European average.</p> <p>The supplement also shows that more than half the Australian papers are below world average.</p> <p>Professor Chubb said Australia did perform better than its regional neighbours using the same measure – average citations per paper over a 15-year period.</p> <p>While Australia outperforms the world standard for research quality in most fields using this measure, so do the countries with which we share scientific culture.</p> <p>“We should compare ourselves with the best in the world. We should not compare ourselves with the rest of the world.’’ Professor Chubb said.</p> <p>As chair of the Australian Research Committee, Professor Chubb is leading development of a framework to improve Australia’s scientific performance and support.</p> <p>You can download the paper <a href="/sites/default/files/OPS6-Paper-for-print.pdf">here</a>, supplement one (ordered listings of the fields and sub-fields in Figures 3 and 4) is available <a href="/sites/default/files/OPS6-Online-supplement.pdf">here</a> and supplement two (global comparison of citation rates) is available <a href="/sites/default/files/OPS6-Online-supplement-21.pdf">here</a>.</p> <p>If you want to view the slideshow Professor Chubb presented to the Universities Australia higher education conference on February 28, click <a href="/sites/default/files/BENCHMARKING-RESEARCH-PRIORITY-SETTING-SLIDESHOW.pdf">here</a></p> <p><strong>Media enquiries: Mick Bunworth 02 6102 8179 or 0410 029 407 or <a href="mailto:Mick.Bunworth@chiefscientist.gov.au">Mick.Bunworth@chiefscientist.gov.au</a></strong></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/news/ocs-publications" hreflang="en">OCS Publications</a></li> <li><a href="/news/occasional-paper-series" hreflang="en">Occasional Paper Series</a></li> </ul> </div> Fri, 22 Feb 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 964 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au