PMSEIC https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/ en PMSEIC 27 https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2013/06/pmseic-27 <h1 class="au-header-heading">PMSEIC 27</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Sat, 2013-06-01 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The 27th meeting of the Prime Minister’s Science Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC) was held on 21 June in Sydney where members gathered for their second meeting of 2013.</p> <p>The meeting heard a progress report from the Chief Scientist about his National Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Strategy.</p> <p>Also tabled were two final project reports – <em>Engineering Energy: Unconventional Gas Production</em> and <em>STEM: Country Comparisons.</em></p> <p>These reports were produced as part of the Securing Australia’s Future program, undertaken on behalf of PMSEIC by the Australian Council of Learned Academies.</p> <p>The meeting received recommendations developed from the findings contained in these two final project reports.</p> <p>These recommendations were developed by the Office of the Chief Scientist in consultation with relevant government departments and the expert working groups responsible for the reports.</p> <p>Relevant departments will respond to the recommendations with an action plan at the next PMSEIC meeting.</p> <p>The meeting also received a report from the Office of the Chief Scientist – <em>The Threat of Antibiotic Resistance: Building a New Frontline Defence</em>which will be released as an Occasional Paper shortly.</p> <p>Prior to the meeting, the Strategic Research Priorities to address the societal challenges facing Australia were released by the Prime Minister, Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Science and Research,Minister for Science and Research and the Chief Scientist.</p> <p>The priorities will ensure that Government support for research is adequate in areas that are of immediate and critical importance to Australia and its place in the world.</p> <p>PMSEIC will reconvene later in the year.</p> <p>Download: –</p> <p>– <a href="/sites/default/files/shalegas-recommendationsFINAL.pdf">Recommendations from the findings of the ACOLA report, Engineering Energy: Unconventional Gas Production</a></p> <p>– The full ACOLA report,<em> Engineering Energy: Unconventional Gas Production</em></p> <p>– <a href="/sites/default/files/STEM-recommendations-for-PMSEIC.pdf">Recommendations from the findings of the ACOLA report STEM: Country Comparisons </a></p> <p>–The fullACOLA report<em> STEM: Country Comparisons </em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Sat, 01 Jun 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 957 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au PMSEIC 26 https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2013/05/pmseic-26 <h1 class="au-header-heading">PMSEIC 26</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Wed, 2013-05-01 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The 26th meeting of the Prime Minister’s Science Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC) was held on 16 April in Melbourne where members gathered for their first meeting of 2013.</p> <p>The process for determining strategic research priorities had been presented to the last PMSEIC meeting in December.</p> <p>The Office of the Chief Scientist (OCS) reported back on the outcomes of a workshop of experts held on 8 February, which developed strategic research priorities to address the societal challenges facing Australia.</p> <p>The priorities will ensure that Government support for research is adequate in areas that are of immediate and critical importance to Australia and its place in the world.</p> <p>The meeting was also given a report on the Securing Australia’s Future program, undertaken on behalf of PMSEIC by the Australian Council of Learned Academies, including two interim project reports – <em>Engineering Energy: Unconventional Gas Production</em> and <em>STEM: Country Comparisons</em>.</p> <p>The report <em>Engineering Energy: Unconventional Gas Production </em>focuses on shale gas in Australia and the opportunities and risks presented by this resource.</p> <p><em>The STEM: Country Comparisons </em>report is an analysis of what other countries are doing to develop participation and enhance performance in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.</p> <p>Also discussed was the case for an Australian Science and Technology Strategy.</p> <p>The purpose of the Strategy is to present a vision for science and technology and its critical role in building a strong, prosperous future for Australia.</p> <p>The Strategy will provide a coherent framework for science and technology related policies and programs.</p> <p>The Council also recognised the contribution of its longest-serving personal member Professor Fiona Stanley AC who is resigning after 19 years of service.</p> <p>Professor Stanley has made a significant contribution to PMSEIC, particularly through her leadership of the working group on “Developmental Health and Well-being – the Future of Australia”.</p> <p>PMSEIC will reconvene later in the year.</p> <p>Download:<a href="/sites/default/files/PMSEIC-April-2013.pdf">The Case for An Australia Science &amp; Technology Strategy</a><a href="/sites/default/files/Supplement-April-2013.pdf">International Science and Innovation Systems</a><a href="/sites/default/files/Attachment-B-2013.pdf">International Science Policy Analysis</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 01 May 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 959 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au PMSEIC 25 https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2012/12/pmseic-25 <h1 class="au-header-heading">PMSEIC 25</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Sat, 2012-12-01 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The 25th meeting of the Prime Minister’s Science Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC) was held today on December 12 in Canberra where members gathered for their third meeting of 2012.</p> <p>The main focus of the meeting was a discussion about breakthrough actions that the Australian government could take to enhance innovation as well as a process for setting national research priorities.</p> <p>It had been agreed at the last PMSEIC meeting in July that the Office of the Chief Scientist (OCS) would provide advice on these matters after a comprehensive consultation process.</p> <p>The OCS wrote to organisations, peak bodies and individuals seeking their answer to the question: <em>What are the top breakthrough actions that the Commonwealth and state/territory governments, research agencies, universities and the business community can take to utilise fully Australia’s substantial research capability to contribute to national productivity growth through innovation?</em></p> <p>Organisations approached included federal government departments, the Business Council of Australia (BCA), Australian Industry Group (AIG), science and research agencies and the learned academies. There were 65 written responses offering a wide range of opinions, with many presenting consistent themes and issues.</p> <p>A new way to look at Australia’s scientific research performance was considered by the Council, which highlights the potential improvement to performance from setting strategic research priorities.</p> <p>To develop the advice on setting national research priorities for Australia, the OCS assessed the relevance, value and applicability of international priority setting procedures. The Chief Scientist also consulted with government scientific advisors in the United States, United Kingdom, European Union and New Zealand.</p> <p>A report on the Securing Australia’s Future program, undertaken on behalf of PMSEIC by the Australian Council of Learned Academies, was tabled; including two interim project reports.</p> <p>PMSEIC will reconvene again in the first quarter of 2013.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Sat, 01 Dec 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 965 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au PMSEIC 24 https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2012/07/pmseic-24 <h1 class="au-header-heading">PMSEIC 24</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Mon, 2012-07-09 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The 24<sup>th</sup> meeting of the Prime Minister’s Science Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC) was held Monday, 9 July in Brisbane where members gathered for the second time this year.</p> <p>The main focus of the meeting was a discussion on the future of Australian science, technology and innovation. Among other matters, the Council considered whether doctoral research programs in Australia were adequately preparing graduates for working as researchers either in the business sector or closely with the business sector; and the importance of international research collaboration with key partner countries to ensure Australia benefits from strong research impact.</p> <p>Council agreed to consider existing policy models internationally and develop a strategic approach to implementing targeted priorities for Commonwealth research expenditure. It was also agreed to undertake targeted consultation to determine the top ten breakthrough actions necessary to achieve strong links between research and industry that would drive innovation and productivity growth for Australia. Progress on both activities will be presented at the next council meeting.</p> <p>Members also defined the Council’s three-year forward work program which will include consideration of reports prepared by the Australian Council of Learned Academies (ACoLA) under the overarching theme of –Securing Australia’s Future’.</p> <p>ACoLA will be covering agreed topics such as Australia’s comparative advantage with regard to our environment, biodiversity, location and culture; the place of Australian science in the Asian Century; the role of science in lifting Australian productivity; new technologies; and engineering energy which is intended to explore unconventional gas options.</p> <p>PMSEIC will reconvene again later in the year.</p> <p>A copy of the paper presented by the Office of the Chief Scientist can be downloaded here: <a href="/sites/default/files/PMSEICJuly2012-singlepage-edits.pdf">PMSEIC</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Mon, 09 Jul 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 977 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au $10 million investment in science advice https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2012/04/10-million-investment-in-science-advice <h1 class="au-header-heading">$10 million investment in science advice</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Sun, 2012-04-01 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The capacity of the Prime Minister’s Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC) has been reinforced by a $10 million Government commitment to the new arrangements.</p> <p>The funding will support research and project work by the Australian Council of Learned Academies (ACoLA).</p> <p>ACoLA brings together our four Learned Academies, including the Australian Academy of Science, Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, and the Australian Academy of the Humanities.</p> <p>The academies, working with the Chief Scientist, will be responsible for research projects that are identified by PMSEIC and that will help develop policy to underpin a resilient economy and secure Australia’s future.</p> <p>The link with ACoLA will allow PMSEIC to draw on the expertise of the academies, and such other expertise as particular topics require. ACoLA will manage the research projects to get the best possible advice to government.</p> <p>The decision was formalised at the latest PMSEIC meeting, held in Sydney on 30 March, 2012. The meeting, chaired by the Prime Minister, the Hon Julia Gillard MP, was the first since new arrangements for the Council were announced by the Government in January this year.</p> <p>The 23<sup>rd</sup> meeting of PMSEIC was attended by Senator the Hon Chris Evans, Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Science and Research; standing members of PMSEIC; as well as Australia’s Chief Scientist, who is Executive Officer of the Council.</p> <p>Other topics of the meeting included the preliminary findings and recommendations of a report on the Health of Australian Science from the Office of the Chief Scientist. This report is a comprehensive analysis of the state of national science research and education effort, science teaching, science workforce and international research collaboration. It will be published in May2012.</p> <p>“The Prime Minister is committed to ensuring she has access to the best possible scientific advice for policy decisions, and I am confident the new PMSEIC and ACoLA arrangements will make that happen,” Professor Chubb said.</p> <p><strong>PMSEIC will meet again in Canberra on Monday, 9 July 2012.</strong></p> <p><strong>Media Enquires: Erin Gordon 0410 029 407</strong></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Sun, 01 Apr 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 853 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au New PMSEIC structure https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2012/01/new-pmseic-structure <h1 class="au-header-heading">New PMSEIC structure</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Sun, 2012-01-01 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Prime Minister Julia Gillard, Minister for Science and Research, Senator Chris Evans, and Australia’s Chief Scientist, Professor Ian Chubb, today announced a number of reforms to the Council to ensure it remains relevant and able to facilitate the best connection between scientific advice and policy.</p> <p>The changes follow an examination of the Council’s operations seeking to ensure that it is nimble, relevant and able to facilitate the best connection between scientific advice and policy.</p> <p>Key features of the new PMSEIC include a smaller membership and more frequent meetings (three times per year), with the capacity to deal with both short term as well as over-the-horizon topics requiring independent scientific advice to Government. A key objective is to ensure that the PMSEIC agenda is relevant to the needs of Government, by providing scientific advice on issues which require the development of a policy response, either in the short term, or over longer term horizons.</p> <p>Commenting on the changes, the Minister advised that the Chief Scientist, Professor Ian Chubb AC, will continue to play a key role as the Executive Officer to PMSEIC.</p> <p>“As in the past, PMSEIC will continue to offer advice and provide expert scientific opinion on policy challenges across the whole of government, including health, the environment, education, IT communications, agriculture and international relations,” Senator Evans said.</p> <p>Professor Chubb said in the past, PMSEIC’s focus was primarily on issues facing Australia’s long term future, looking five to 30 years ahead, rather than on issues immediately affecting the country.</p> <p>“The role of foresighting is still an important part of PMSEIC’s work, but we cannot ignore the fact that the Government also needs scientific advice on immediate issues like nanotechnology, immunisations, industrial waste and stem cell therapies,” Professor Chubb said.</p> <p>Under the new model, long-term issues requiring a scientific response will be referred to the Australian Council of Learned Academies, representing the four Learned Academies, to undertake in depth, interdisciplinary research and report to the government through the Chief Scientist.</p> <p>PMSEIC’s revised membership will include:</p> <ul> <li>Prime Minister (chair);</li> <li>Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Science and Research (alternate chair);</li> <li>Minister for IndustryandInnovation;</li> <li>Other Ministers relevant to the meeting, at invitation of the Prime Minister;</li> <li>Australia’s Chief Scientist;</li> <li>CEO of the Australian Research Council;</li> <li>CEO of the National Health and Medical Research Council and;</li> <li>Six individual standing members, chosen for their contributions to science and research:</li> </ul> <p>Dr Megan Clark; Dr Cathy Foley; Dr Ben Greene; Professor Robert Saint;Professor Fiona Stanley; and Professor Graeme Turner.</p> <p>PMSEIC will convene in early 2012.</p> <p>Read the media release here.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Sun, 01 Jan 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 976 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au PMSEIC releases impact statements for reports on food security and energy-water-carbon intersections https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2011/02/pmseic-releases-impact-statements-for-reports-on-food-security-and-energy-water-carbon-intersections <h1 class="au-header-heading">PMSEIC releases impact statements for reports on food security and energy-water-carbon intersections</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Tue, 2011-02-01 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>To coincide with the 22<sup>nd</sup> meeting of the Prime Minister’s Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC), two impact statements for the reports <em>Australia and Food Security in a Changing World</em> and <em>Challenges at Energy-Water-Carbon Intersections</em>, have been released.</p> <p>The impact statements address the key themes and outline critical goals for each report.</p> <p>Both reports will be discussed today (4 February 2011) with the full Council.</p> <p>A presentation on the reports will also be delivered at a public forum in the Parliament House Lecture Theatre from 2pm – 3.30pm on the same date.</p> <p>The impact statements can be downloaded here:</p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/PMSEIC-EWC-Impact-Statement.pdf">Challenges at Energy-Water-Carbon Intersections Impact Statement</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/PMSEIC-Food-Impact-Statement.pdf">Food Security in a Changing World Impact Statement</a></p> <p>Copies of the full report can be downloaded here:</p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/FINAL_EnergyWaterCarbon_for_WEB.pdf">Challenges at Energy-Water-Carbon Intersections Report</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/FoodSecurity_web.pdf">Food Security in a Changing World Report</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Tue, 01 Feb 2011 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1057 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Securing Australia's future: PMSEIC releases expert reports on food security and energy-water-carbon intersections https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2010/12/securing-australia%25e2%2580%2599s-future-pmseic-releases-expert-reports-on-food-security-and-energy-water-carbon-intersections <h1 class="au-header-heading">Securing Australia&#039;s future: PMSEIC releases expert reports on food security and energy-water-carbon intersections</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Wed, 2010-12-01 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Two Expert Working Group reports were released today on topics key to the sustainable future of Australia and its people: <em>Australia and Food Security in a Changing World</em> and <em>Challenges at Energy-Water-Carbon Intersections.</em></p> <p>The reports were developed at the behest of the Prime Minister’s Science, Engineering and Innovation Council which provides independent advice on major national issues in science, engineering and technology and their contribution to the economic and social development of Australia.</p> <p>While developed independently of each other, the two reports do overlap on a number of issues, including the impact of climate change, the importance of water, and the need to build a resilient Australia.</p> <p>“We charged the cross-disciplinary, expert groups that authored these reports to take a holistic approach, to look at the big picture, and not just a single piece of the science-society interface.</p> <p>“The independent, scientific reports they produced are ground-breaking and vital to the future of the nation. I am delighted that they have been released today so that they can inform not only government decision-making, but also public discourse,” Australia’s former Chief Scientist and Executive Officer of PMSEIC, Professor Penny Sackett said</p> <p><strong><em>Challenges at Energy-Water-Carbon Intersections</em></strong></p> <p>The interplay between energy, water and carbon in human activities has been made more complex and more pressing by the need to mitigate climate change risk through reducing carbon emissions, whilst continuing to supply energy, water and nutritious and affordable food to a growing population.</p> <p>“Our energy systems use water; water systems use energy; current energy generation is greenhouse gas (GHG)-intensive; and land uses for food, fibre and energy production all require water.</p> <p>“Solutions in any one area must take into account implications for the others. Ideally solutions, whether on the scale of national governments, cities, or rural areas, would be developed integrally.</p> <p>“For example, traditional desalination to increase urban water supplies may significantly add to GHG emissions, which can exacerbate climate change, “Professor Sackett said.</p> <p>A key recommendation of the PMSEIC energy-water-carbon report is to implement consistent principles for the accounting and pricing such as water, energy and carbon emissions into the atmosphere.</p> <p>“Consistent accounting and pricing principles are required to ensure our finite resources are used effectively, efficiently, and in ways that are consistent with long-term sustainability and resilience.</p> <p>“The implementation of integrated smart networks for energy and water, which is also recommended in the report, will go a long way in enabling the application of these principles,” Professor Sackett remarked.</p> <p>Another set of recommendations put forward in the report describes positive steps to achieve enhanced resilience and sustainability of our built environments and landscapes.</p> <p>“Essentially what this means is that Australia, as a nation composed of individual communities linked by common challenges of water, energy and climate, should develop the ability to recover from shocks such as droughts, floods, and heatwaves, while adapting through learning and innovation, and undergoing transformation as required,” Professor Sackett explained.</p> <p><strong><em>Australia and Food Security in a Changing World</em></strong></p> <p>Australia is currently a net exporter of food, with considerable expertise in food production under resource constraints and in the face of climate variability. However the PMSEIC report suggests increased challenges to this important Australian industry including: land degradation, population growth, long-term climate change, competition for arable land, scarcity of water, and nutrient and energy availability.</p> <p>“Food security does not just mean having enough food in a typical year. It means having reliable and sustainable access to acceptable, nutritious, and affordable food at all times.</p> <p>“Australians expect this security, and about 40 million non-Australians internationally rely on our country to secure their food as well.”</p> <p>“The food security report recommends a visionary approach that brings together regulatory and funding agencies, research organisations and industry, to achieve strong outcomes in economic growth and population health centred on food.</p> <p>“These steps include urgent new investment in food science and technology that will spur future transformational change in healthy and efficient food production; increasing our human capacity to provide a suitably skilled workforce for the food sector; and translating community awareness of food into better food choices,” Professor Sackett said.</p> <p>Both expert reports address long-term, transformational issues for Australia that affect the whole nation and thus will require a whole-of-government response. They will be discussed further with the Prime Minister and other Council members at the next PMSEIC meeting, scheduled for 4 February 2011.</p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/FoodSecurity_web.pdf">Read Australia and Food Security in a Changing World</a></p> <p><a href="/sites/default/files/FINAL_EnergyWaterCarbon_for_WEB.pdf">Read Challenges at Energy-Water-Carbon Intersections</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Wed, 01 Dec 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 968 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au Epidemics in a changing world https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/2009/10/epidemics-in-a-changing-world <h1 class="au-header-heading">Epidemics in a changing world</h1> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span>Thu, 2009-10-01 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>At the twentieth meeting of the Prime Minister’s Science Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC) held on June 5 2009, an Expert Working Group presented a report titled Epidemics in a Changing World. This report considered the factors that prompt the emergence of infectious diseases, and that alter the frequency, location and spread of disease in a changing global environment. It was noted that humans are the key contributor to this change, through population growth, climate change and associated environmental impacts.</p> <p>The report also identified that the infectious agents that cause such diseases constantly evolve. This makes the prediction of future threats very difficult — so we must expect to be surprised. The report identified several key ways for Australia to strengthen its capabilities to prevent and manage epidemics.</p> <p>The Expert Working Group members came from a wide range of scientific disciplines and organisations. Many of the members had been previously or were currently actively engaged in operations or research associated with animal or human epidemics in Australia and overseas. They drew heavily on their extensive scientific knowledge and expertise in considering the topic, in fields including virology, entomology, epidemiology, medical science and veterinary science.</p> <h2>The recommendations</h2> <p>Science and innovation will provide the key to safeguarding Australia’s future. The report focused on ensuring that Australia is well placed to deal with the effect of global changes on the occurrence and spread of human and animal epidemic diseases.</p> <p>The Expert Working Group noted that Australia’s current operational response to disease control is effective — and has been in recent times for disease events which have not resulted in major global epidemics. The recommendations presented were seen as providing Australia with the preparedness and agility to cope with the unknown challenges of a future world that may provide a substantively different environment for epidemic disease.</p> <p>In order to underpin Australia’s preparedness to deal with emerging epidemic diseases the Group recommended that:</p> <p><strong><em>1. Australia possesses the human capacity to combat potential epidemics</em></strong></p> <p><strong>The nation must be prepared and sufficiently agile to deal with unexpected epidemics. This requires that we develop, maintain and retain skilled people through:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>conducting ongoing national workforce planning for expertise in human and animal epidemic diseases; and</strong></li> <li><strong>boosting higher education and research training in areas of need.</strong></li> </ul> <p>In order to provide early warning of the emergence of epidemic diseases the Group recommended that:</p> <p><strong><em>2. Australia possesses a long term biosecurity information collection, analysis and interpretation capability</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Capability must be developed and maintained to collect, analyse and interpret disease surveillance information. This must be secured by:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>creating an ongoing, effective national human and animal disease information system; and</strong></li> <li><strong>integrating this system with similar systems operating overseas.</strong></li> </ul> <p>In order to enhance Australia’s wider ability to deal with emerging epidemic diseases the Group recommended that:</p> <p><strong><em>3. Australia develops forward regional engagement to mitigate potential epidemic.</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Australia needs to commit human and other resources to engage our region on disease surveillance, preparedness and mitigation, through capacity building and collaboration. This requires that we develop political, scientific and technical relationships with our neighbours, at multiple levels, to reduce human and animal disease risk to Australia and the region by:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>establishing an active ongoing cross portfolio mechanism involving PM&amp;C, DFAT, DoHA, DAFF, DIISR, DEEWR and other relevant agencies dedicated to managing and supporting effective regional engagement; and</strong></li> <li><strong>assisting regional countries to meet their obligations under the WHO International Health Regulations and the World Organisation for Animal Health requirements through:</strong> <ul> <li><strong>supporting development of collaborative regional surveillance and early warning systems; and</strong></li> <li><strong>developing regional expertise through professional training and higher education in Australia and in the region.</strong></li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>In order to secure the front-line defences needed to deal with emerging epidemic diseases the Group recommended that:</p> <p><strong><em>4. Australia has a self-sufficient vaccine development and production capacity</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Australia needs to retain and enhance its onshore development and production capacity for vaccines. This is essential for domestic preparedness and, as importantly, to enable access to the latest overseas expertise and technology in this field. The focus should be on the onshore development and production capacity for:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>contemporary influenza vaccines; and</strong></li> <li><strong>niche vaccines, particularly in the context of future Australian needs.</strong></li> </ul> <p>In order to better coordinate our ability to deal with emerging epidemic diseases the Group recommended that:</p> <p><strong><em>5. The Government establishes the cross-portfolio arrangements essential for effective implementation of Recommendations 1, 2 and 3 as a matter of immediate priority.</em></strong></p> <p>Please visit the <a href="http://www.industry.gov.au/science/pmseic/pmseicmeetings/Pages/default.aspx">PMSEIC website</a> to view the full report.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-news-categories field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="position-above">Categories</div> <ul class="au-tags"> <li><a href="/archive/PMSEIC" hreflang="en">PMSEIC</a></li> </ul> </div> Thu, 01 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Anonymous 1117 at https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au